Why do Catholics believe in transubstantiation

Majority of US Catholics do not believe in change

Nearly seven out of ten practicing US Catholics do not believe that the bread and wine are changed into the body and blood of Jesus Christ during Holy Communion.

A recent poll by the Washington-based research institute Pew Research Center found that many Catholics do not share this central teaching of the Roman Catholic Church. Instead, the majority of respondents stated that bread and wine are only “symbols of the body and blood of Jesus Christ”.

APA / Hand Klaus Techt

The change or transubstantiation is a central part of the Catholic faith

Only a third of all US Catholics actually see the body and blood of Jesus in it. Among the people who regularly attend the fair, however, more than 60 percent accept the so-called transubstantiation theory.

Elders are more likely to believe

The Pew poll also shows that belief in the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist is still most widespread among older Catholics.

Transubstantiation - the idea that the bread and wine used in communion become the body and blood of Jesus Christ when transformed by the priest - is a central part of the Catholic faith. According to the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), the Eucharist is “the source and culmination of all Christian life”.

religion.ORF.at/KAP/KNA

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