Many congratulations are grammatically correct

You can express wishes with the verb want or (yourself) to wish express.

The verb want can be used with an accusative object or with a second verb in the infinitive.

Otto:

I would like to a glass of champagne.

I would like to my life with you spend, Inge!

The verb to wish is used reflexively when one wishes something for oneself. This is followed by an accusative object or a that-sentence. The reflexive pronoun is in the dative case.

I wish me a future with you.

I I wish that we are happy together.

 

One can express many wishes with the subjunctive II of be or to have and the adverb with pleasure) express.

Nico:

I wouldwith pleasure often with Selma.

I would havewith pleasure a good relationship with Selma's parents.

In the subjunctive II you conjugate be and to have so:

Singular: 
1st personI would
2nd personyou would be
(you would be) *
3rd personhe / she / it would be
Plural: 
1st personwe would be
2nd personyou would be
(you would be) *
3rd personthey would be
formally:You would be

* There are two forms here. The second form is rarely used.
 

Singular: 
1st personI would have
2nd personyou would have
3rd personhe / she / it would have
Plural: 
1st personwe would have
2nd personyou would have
3rd personthey would have
formally:You would have

 

If you do not to have or be but another verb, one can use the subjunctive would + Form infinitive (+ with pleasure)).

Selma:

I wouldwith pleasure a lot of time with Nico spend.

The verb become is conjugated in the subjunctive II as follows:

Singular: 
1st personI would
2nd personyou would
3rd personhe / she / it would
Plural: 
1st personwe would
2nd personyou would
3rd personthey would
formally:You would


To express a wish, one can also say: I wish, ... This expression is used when one wishes for something that is not possible. Then the verb must be in the subjunctive II.

Example: Nina is pregnant. That's why she can't drink champagne.

Nina:

I wish, i could now have a glass of champagne too.