What's good about simple sugars

How do carbohydrates differ from one another?

Simple sugars (monosaccharides)
Double sugar (disaccharides)
Polysaccharides
What carbohydrates does my food contain?
Fiber

Simple sugars (monosaccharides)

Carbohydrates are all made up of simple sugars. There are many simple sugars, the best known are: fruit sugar (fructose), grape sugar (glucose) and mucus sugar (galactose). These simple sugars do not have to be broken down during digestion and are immediately absorbed into the bloodstream by the body. Here they serve the body as a supplier of energy. The digestion of simple sugars is extremely fast. That is also the reason why dextrose or apple juice (fruit sugar) is very suitable as "quick BE" for hypoglycaemia.

Double sugar (disaccharides)

The single sugars can be combined with each other to form double sugars. They form, for example, table sugar (sucrose) and milk sugar (lactose). The connections between the simple sugars have to be broken down during digestion before the body can absorb the simple sugars into the bloodstream. The digestion of double sugars is slower than that of single sugars, but it is still fast.

Polysaccharides

If many simple sugars are linked together, they form a long chain. A network, such as starch, can form from many sugar chains. During digestion, all bonds between the simple sugars are loosened piece by piece. This complex digestive process takes much longer; the simple sugars produced by the breakdown are released into the blood very slowly. For people with type 2 diabetes, foods with multiple sugars are often cheap.

What carbohydrates does my food contain?

In the case of packaged products, you can look at the nutritional table that must be specified on the product packaging [link to nutrition detectives]: "Carbohydrates" gives the value for all sugars together. “Of which sugar” is the specification for all single and double sugars combined. The higher this value, the faster the blood sugar level "shoots" up after eating. The difference between the two figures (i.e. total carbohydrates minus sugar) is the amount of polysaccharides. For unpackaged food, nutritional tables (e.g. from the DGE) provide information.

Fiber

Dietary fiber is part of food that cannot be digested. They keep the intestines healthy, keep you full for a long time and make the blood sugar level rise more slowly after a meal.

[As of June 2017, KR]

Source:

Alexandra Schek, Nutrition compact, 6th edition 2017, Umschau Zeitschriftenverlag